Counting the value of the South West's sheep

Welsh Landscape_43713

Sheep farming is a vital part of the region’s economy and of the utmost importance to the environment, according to new report compiled by the Rural Business School at Duchy College and commissioned by the National Farmers Union (NFU).

A full copy of the report is available in 'related documents' below.

Across the South West there are 7,389 sheep farms which have a total of around 3.1 million sheep. About half of these are breeding ewes. These farms employ 7,000 people directly and there are almost 23,000 other jobs linked to the industry, which contributes nearly £60m to the economy in terms of employment.

Almost 111,000 hectares of land involved in sheep production is in an entry or higher level stewardship scheme and the report highlights how much sheep farming can help the environment, with song birds preferring the ‘mosaic of habitats’ it creates. By controlling the bracken which would otherwise dominate uplands landscapes, ‘grazing by sheep plays an important role in the management of the uplands and ensures they remain accessible and visually as the public have come to expect’.

Across the South West the authors estimate that sheep farmers have planted 627km of hedgerow, which, if they were laid end-to-end, would stretch from Penzance to Blackpool.

Researchers found that across England the sheep sector is worth £291m to the economy, which equates to 34,000 direct on-farm jobs and a further 111,405 positions in allied industries including shearers, vets, machinery suppliers and feed companies. Every year the region produces just under 28,000 tonnes of sheep meat, worth £207m.

We want to see a thriving and profitable sheep sector that delivers environmental, social and economic benefits.

Colin Rowland, South West livestock board chairman

In order to keep the industry healthy, the report concludes there is a need for ‘more transparency’ further down the food chain, with processors and retailers being clear about the specifications they require from finished sheep and refraining from such practices as altering specifications half-way through the season.

Sheep farmers are encouraged to focus their efforts on parts of the business which are likely to show the most profit and make use of the latest technical innovations to produce a high-quality and consistent product.

The report also warns of the consequences of the likely effects of Brexit. The NFU is currently holding a series of meetings to hear farmers’ opinions about Defra’s ‘command paper’ describing what life might look like after Britain is no longer part of the Common Agricultural Policy.

According to the authors, Brexit could put the sector in a ‘very vulnerable position’, because of the likelihood of reduced BPS payments – which many sheep farms depend on – and lower prices for sheep meat, due to increased domestic supply if less is exported to the EU.

Colin Rowland, a Devon sheep farmer and chairman of the South West NFU livestock board, said the report made it clear that sheep farming has a great deal to offer for food, the environment and the economy in our rural communities.

“In this region, we grow grass extremely efficiently. We have a relatively warm climate, more hours of sunshine than any other part of the UK and plenty of rain – ideal for raising West Country lamb on a diet which has the added benefit of being a source of omega-3, vitamin E and many more vital nutrients in the human diet.

“But the report also shows that the sheep sector has the potential to be the hardest hit by Brexit, with challenges to rural funding, the availability of labour in the processing sector and the damage that could be done if we do not have access to the EU export market and fail to gain new markets for our sheep meat globally.

“Ultimately, we want to see a thriving and profitable sheep sector that delivers environmental, social and economic benefits.”

Last edited on: 26:03:2018

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  • Posted by: Fairfax LuxmoorePosted on: 05/04/2018 07:59:45

    Comment: DIn reply to Philip Bowens comments on the Duchy and NFU report on sheep .
    Bracken is carcinogenic and when my horses went to Duchy College for the winter last year they had 100 plus ticks on each of them . I asked my Landlords if I could weed wipe the field I was grazing at Burrator but it was in a stewardship scheme so for some reason Natural England refuse to even put lime on the field ! The ticks are a source of Lyme disease and its reputation, with the 5% expansion of Bracken on Dartmoor each year, puts off tourists. Cattle don’t want to go into head high gorse or Bracken and so grazing areas are limited leading to eroding of paths.
    Mary Alford , Vice Chair of Commoners, has complained at excessive amounts of Bracken on the Commons since Out wintering of Suckler Cows ceased in the Winter! The SW Galloway Society all said they wanted their cows out wintered at their AGM in 2017. Even Defra agreed in May 2017 that Asulox was appropriate to reduce bracken without killing grass underneath it
    Even when at Ag College 50 years ago trampling of Bracken with cattle, not sheep, in the winter was accepted along with a good frost to kill bracken.
    The NFU must know better than to expect all the year round grazing with sheep is an alternative to Sheep Cattle and Pony grazing all the year round!
    Geoff Eyre writes about increased biodiversity on his farm after reclaiming from Bracken. He uses a weedwiper behind a Soft Trak with Glyphosate to kill bracken and then over sows, with a Vredo or similar drill, whichever grass seed with clover after liming is appropriate. He writes:

    This winter we have now grazed 280 ewes and hoggs on once useless bracken and the area had 6 prs curlew breed ,many brown hares,a few grouse and two pairs of ring ouzel along with numerous skylarks,also heath butterflies/bilberry bees , never saw a bird when bracken.?

    We cant have production increased on our uplands as they were 25 years ago without improving the grazing areas. The hill above Dartmeet won prizes 25 years ago but now limited gra
  • Posted by: Fairfax LuxmoorePosted on: 05/04/2018 08:02:16

    Comment: In reply to Philip Bowens comments on the Duchy and NFU report on sheep .
    Bracken is carcinogenic and when my horses went to Duchy College for the winter last year they had 100 plus ticks on each of them . I asked my Landlords if I could weed wipe the field I was grazing at Burrator but it was in a stewardship scheme so for some reason Natural England refuse to even put lime on the field ! The ticks are a source of Lyme disease and its reputation, with the 5% expansion of Bracken on Dartmoor each year, puts off tourists. Cattle don’t want to go into head high gorse or Bracken and so grazing areas are limited leading to eroding of paths.
    Mary Alford , Vice Chair of Commoners, has complained at excessive amounts of Bracken on the Commons since Out wintering of Suckler Cows ceased in the Winter! The SW Galloway Society all said they wanted their cows out wintered at their AGM in 2017. Even Defra agreed in May 2017 that Asulox was appropriate to reduce bracken without killing grass underneath it
    Even when at Ag College 50 years ago trampling of Bracken with cattle, not sheep, in the winter was accepted along with a good frost to kill bracken.
    The NFU must know better than to expect all the year round grazing with sheep is an alternative to Sheep Cattle and Pony grazing all the year round!
    Geoff Eyre writes about increased biodiversity on his farm after reclaiming from Bracken. He uses a weedwiper behind a Soft Trak with Glyphosate to kill bracken and then over sows, with a Vredo or similar drill, whichever grass seed with clover after liming is appropriate. He writes:

    This winter we have now grazed 280 ewes and hoggs on once useless bracken and the area had 6 prs curlew breed ,many brown hares,a few grouse and two pairs of ring ouzel along with numerous skylarks,also heath butterflies/bilberry bees , never saw a bird when bracken.?

    We cant have production increased on our uplands as they were 25 years ago without improving the grazing areas. The hill above Dartmeet won prizes 25 years ago but now limited graz

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