NFU Farmers for Schools programme – October training dates

18 August 2022

NFU Education
An image of secondary school students asking questions at a careers event in Teesdale the North East of England

We’ve added an additional training date for our Farmers for Schools programme. Learn how to promote our industry to secondary school children and bust some myths along the way.

We want to help secondary school children understand farming and agriculture better.

As tomorrow's consumers, it's vital that they learn about the work farmers do. We want to show them how farmers are addressing climate change, harnessing technology, looking after the environment, and producing food to world-leading standards.

Farmers for Schools

As part of our Farmers for Schools programme, we’re asking NFU members to deliver a 30 to 45-minute assembly in local secondary schools about day-to-day life on their farm. This gives you a chance to showcase the value of British farming and correct any myths or misconceptions, as well as answer questions from students.

NFU President Minette Batters said: “This is an exciting programme that will give farmers the opportunity to pass on their knowledge and expertise to the next generation, as well as talking about farming’s vital role in producing food for the nation and the role it plays in caring for the environment.

“With the popularity of our Farmvention competition, we see year on year how much the nation’s students love to get involved with farming as part of their education.”

Training

Our training course will give you the tools to deliver an engaging and thought-provoking presentation for an assembly.

It'll also give you the opportunity to network with other NFU members and discuss how to best share your farming story.

To book onto one of our training dates below, please complete our online registration form.

Training dates

  • 4 October – London
  • 6 October – Stoneleigh HQ
  • 18 October – York

Training testimonials 

We recently trained more than 140 NFU members to speak to teenagers in secondary schools about the people who produce their food and the realities and career opportunities of modern farming in the UK. 

NFU chief education manager Josh Payne said: “It’s been great to get back to the classroom. I can’t wait to hear how our trainees get on when they start their classroom lessons. Getting into schools, especially in urban areas, is a great way of connecting young people to the food they buy and eat.”

We spoke to three of the farmers who took part in our training to find out what they thought.

Thomas Saunders, mixed farmer and Harper Adams student, East Anglia

The NFU Education team delivered a very informative presentation.

The mixed age environment was excellent. It allowed trainees with a couple of years or several decades of farming experience to discuss and deliver small sections of their potential presentations to each other.

I learned how to summarise key information to ensure the audience remain interested.

We really need to make positive changes within farming, and school pupils are the industry’s future. It is crucial that they understand the importance of backing British farming.

This will ensure that our industry continues to be strong, dynamic and efficient. The more people trained to speak in schools, the greater the understanding of British farming among the population.

Thomas Saunders_84677

“The more people trained to speak in schools, the greater the understanding of British farming among the population.”
Thomas Saunders

Rebecca Wilson, livestock farmer, North East

As soon as I arrived at the training I knew it would be a relaxed day, focused on collaboration and learning from each other.

It was great to see a wide variety of ages, genders and agricultural sectors represented.

We all learned something new about how to help get the message about British agriculture and food production across to school children. 

I am looking forward to visiting schools and delivering the presentation I made during the training, describing my journey into farming and busting some myths.

I also hope to build a relationship with the schools and ultimately have school children visiting the farm at home.

I would definitely recommend the training to anyone involved in the agricultural industry. To be able to share a message about the fantastic work that we do on farm for animal welfare and the environment, for example, is a second to none opportunity to speak to our future consumers and employees.

Rebecca Wilson, Student & Young Farmer Ambassador_84679

“I would definitely recommend the training to anyone involved in the agricultural industry. To be able to share a message about the fantastic work that we do on farm for animal welfare and the environment, for example, is a second to none opportunity to speak to our future consumers and employees.”
Rebecca Wilson

Sian Davies, mixed farmer, mid Wales

It was great to meet new people who are keen to get involved in the Farmers for Schools programme. 

The first part of the course was aimed at telling our farming story to engage our audience in our day-to-day life. This covered aspects such as what we farm, what we produce, our journey to becoming a farmer and how our workload varies throughout the year.

The second part of the presentation was myth-busting around important issues such as emissions, animal welfare and caring for the environment. 

It was a really engaging day and an opportunity for us to prepare a presentation for the schools. 

I have never done something like this before and I am excited to be part of the programme to help showcase the best of British farming to children from all over the country.

Sian Davies, NFU Student & Young Farming Ambassador_84678

“I am excited to be part of the programme to help showcase the best of British farming to children from all over the country.”
Sian Davies

Farmers for Schools – why you should get involved